Stocks HSBC Holdings PLC

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • Markets are braced for more hemorrhaging in jobs, with a Friday employment report expected to record 200,00 more jobs vaporized in October. This would push the jobless rate up two-tenths of a point to 6.3 percent.

  • Stocks closed lower as investors worried about the global economic downturn and enthusiasm for China's deep-pocketed stimulus plan faded.

  • Markets are braced for more hemorrhaging in jobs, with a Friday employment report expected to record 200,00 more jobs vaporized in October. This would push the jobless rate up two-tenths of a point to 6.3 percent.

  • Stocks shot out of the gate Monday, boosted by China's massive stimulus plan.  Techs sat out the rally, dragged down by Dish Networks after the satellite TV provider's dismal results and Google after Microsoft announced a deal with Sun.

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    Europe's biggest bank HSBC Holdings said its profit in the third quarter was ahead of a year earlier as growth in Asia helped offset almost $5 billion in bad debts on U.S. home loans and asset write downs.

  • Stocks shot out of the gate Monday, helped by developments in the financial sector and China's near-$600 billion economic stimulus plan, announced over the weekend.

  • Stock index futures pointed to a sharp rally at the open Monday, thanks in part to China announcing a near-$600 billion economic stimulus plan over the weekend.

  • Street crowd

    Markets are braced for more hemorrhaging in jobs, with a Friday employment report expected to record 200,00 more jobs vaporized in October. This would push the jobless rate up two-tenths of a point to 6.3 percent.

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    The Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee cut interest rates by a surprising 150 basis points, the deeper cut since the bank became independent in 1997, to help the economy fend off a recession.

  • Hong Kong dropped 12 percent to its lowest level in 5 years, S&P futures have swung in a 60 point range this morning, though they are well off their lows.

  • European nations scrambled on Sunday night to prevent a growing credit crisis from bringing down major banks and alarming savers as troubles in financial markets spread around the world, accelerating economic downturns on three continents, the New York Times reported.

  • Stocks logged a 200-point gain amid news that lawmakers are close to reaching an agreement on a Wall Street bailout.

  • Stocks shot up after a report that lawmakers are very close to reaching an agreement on a Wall Street bailout.

  • Stocks rallied Thursday amid hopes that a bailout will get passed this week. However, gains were curbed by worries about General Electric's lowered outlook and misses in two key economic stats.

  • Stocks opened higher Thursday amid hopes that a bailout will get passed today. However, gains were curbed by worries about General Electric's lowered outlook and misses in two key economic stats.

  • Futures cut their gains in half after two economic reports — jobless claims and durable-goods orders — missed their targets and General Electric lowered its outlook. But they still pointed to a higher open for Wall Street as hopes for progress on the government's proposed bailout for the financial system grew, despite uncertainty about how the $700 billion plan would work.