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Stocks International Business Machines Corp

  • Stocks declined Thursday as Treasurys erased most of their gains ahead of a 30-year bond auction and despite evidence the U.S. economy continues to improve.  DuPont and Travelers fell, while BofA rose.

  • Stocks jumped Tuesday as investors bet that a deal to extend tax breaks will prompt increased spending and lift the economy. Craig Callahan, founder and president of ICON Advisors, and Scott Redler, chief strategic officer at T3live.com, shared their outlooks.

  • With almost 25 stocks in the S&P 500 that have triple digit price tags, which should investors own going forward? David Dietze, president and chief investment strategist at Point View Financial Services and David Sowerby, chief market analyst and portfolio manager at Loomis Sayles & Co. shared their best plays.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Wednesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Nasdaq-vs-US-Dollar-Index.jpg

    With the S&P ending November little changed is a big chill about to settle over the market?

  • Euro bills and coins in cash register tray

    Billions of euros of EU funds to promote growth in Europe’s rundown regions are lying idle because cash-strapped national governments cannot find the necessary matching funds to release the money. The FT reports.

  • Stocks declined, but ended significantly off session lows, as financials gained and the dollar slipped, although investors remained concerned about the effectiveness of Europe's attempt to contain sovereign debt troubles.  HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.

  • Stocks came back from session lows as financials gained, although the market remained lower amid continuing fears about Europe's ability to harness a credit crisis despite a weekend bailout agreement for Ireland. HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.

  • Stocks sank Monday as a strong start to the December holiday shopping season failed to counter investor concerns about the wider implications of debt burdens throughout Europe even as a final agreement was reached on Ireland's bailout fund. HP and Boeing slumped, while Bank of America rose.

  • If the past week is any indication, you’d better buckle your seatbelt. A wild ride may lie ahead!

  • The impact from slowing government spending might be felt for quarters to come in the tech sector, said Maria Grant, head of Americas cross-product research team at Goldman Sachs. So how should investors be positioned? She shared her best investment ideas.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Thursday's Squawk on the Street.

  • With tech companies flush with cash are more Silicon Valley shot gun weddings on the way?

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    Corporations appear to have fewer questions than lawmakers about how climate change will alter how the world uses energy and natural resources, and are actively pursuing technologies they expect will give them a leg up in an economy less dependent on fossil fuels.

  • With the Group of 20 meeting in Seoul to discuss how to revive the global economy, Warren Meyers of DME Securities and David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors joined CNBC on Thursday to share where they're investing.

  • Stocks tumbled Thursday after a disappointing outlook from Cisco rattled the market, and amid continuing troubles with European debt. Ethan Anderson, portfolio manager at Rehmann Financial, and Maury Fertig, CIO of Relative Value Partners, shared their insights.

  • Stocks pared losses in the last few minutes of the session to end higher capping a stellar week for the markets marked by Republican gains in Congress, the Fed's decision to pump more money into the economy, and a surprising strong jobs report.  Alcoa and JPMorgan rose.

  • Stocks pared losses but remained mixed in the last minutes of Friday's session as stronger-than-expected U.S. job gains in October failed to continue a rally that led stocks to two-year highs on Thursday. Kraft and Merck fell, Alcoa rose.

  • Better to lock in the gains while you can.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.