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  • The show was over, but Cramer kept going. Don't miss his in-depth answers to audience questions about Merck, Target and more.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Eli Lilly

    For the second time this week, big pharma is taking a beating from critical reports about medications. This time, it's antidepressants. But one analyst thinks the drag on shares is overdone -- and names "exciting" pharma stocks.

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    If or when you watch one of the presidential  debates count how many times the candidates say, "the drug companies." Of course, it depends on which party's debate you might be watching, but since I started paying attention to the race in recent weeks, I've taken notice how much those three words seem to be apart of boilerplate answers and statements...

  • In the wake of Pfizer pulling the plug on its poor-selling inhaled insulin Exubera, the world's biggest diabetes drug company, Novo Nordisk is throwing in the towel on development of its version of inhaled insulin.

  • Eli Lilly

    Even though I'm back on the East Coast today I wanted to share what I think is an interesting anecdote from my time Monday at the JPMorgan Healthcare Conference which is wrapping up in San Francisco.

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    BioMed Tracker, which closely monitors the clinical trial and drug approval process for investors, is out with a new report today on the Food and Drug Administration's record last year. The drug approval rate went down 13 percent and the number of "approvable letters" went up a whopping 40 percent. An approvable letter has become a euphemism for "delay."

  • Eli Lilly Tuesday said U.S. regulators approved once-daily use of two low-dose forms of its Cialis anti-impotence drug, offering greater convenience for men expecting frequent sexual activity.

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    Alcoa (AA) kicks off earnings season Wednesday after the bell. Which stocks and sectors look the best?

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    Slowdown talk hurts tech, commodities, defense stocks today. UBS downgrades IBM on concerns about a slowing in tech orders; Deutsche Bank downgrades Boeing and Goodrich. Commodities weak across the board—metals, steel, iron ore (2nd day in a row.) Defensive stocks—consumer, drugs all strong. Lilly upgraded at Morgan Stanley.

  • Stocks rebounded to close mixed amid worries over the economy and geopolitical tensions.

  • Okay, the real "Granddaddy of 'em all" was actually this past Tuesday at the Rose Bowl (I promise that's my last reference to the amazing USC Trojans unless they win a split national championship), but the granddaddy of healthcare investment conferences begins on Monday in San Francisco.

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    You’ve probably noticed one of the many scenic TV commercials that advertise prescription drugs. But did you notice what some of them are attempting to sell you?

  • Eli Lilly

    Eli Lilly announced this morning that Chairman and CEO Sidney Taurel is retiring as CEO on March 31st next year. He will stay on as Chairman and on April Fool's Day Chief Operating Officer John Lechleiter will take over as CEO. Investors, at least in early trading, seem to like the choice.

  • Merry Christmas! The ECB's decision to inject half a trillion (trillion!) into the global marketplace (technically, they are providing what is essentially unlimited loans at a fixed fate for the next couple weeks) is definitely giving equities a shot in the arm this morning. This should put some pressure on bonds, lower LIBOR rates, and maybe prop up the dollar a bit.

  • Eli Lilly Tuesday said Sidney Taurel, the drugmaker's long-time chief executive officer, will retire on March 31 and will be succeeded by Chief Operating Officer John Lechleiter.

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    Earlier this week I blogged about Amgen's negative test results for its anemia drug Aranesp in breast cancer. The studies showed the drug may have caused tumors to grow and death. This morning it almost seems like there's a delayed market reaction.

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    The drug industry could face plunging sales as patents on some blockbusters are set to expire, according to Thursday’s WSJ. Can you trade the Journal’s grim prognosis?

  • Eli Lilly

    Eli Lilly Thursday forecast 2008 earnings above Wall Street expectations and said it remained on track to seek U.S. approval this month for prasugrel, a blood clot preventer, which posted mixed results in a recent large clinical trial.

  • CEO Jim Cornelius

    Regular blog readers are well aware of my relentless pursuit of big CEO interviews. So, I wanted to give the backstory to a surprising CEO cancellation of a previously scheduled and confirmed interview today by Bristol-Myers Squibb. A few weeks ago, my producer Ruth and I got tentative confirmation from a Bristol spokesman that the relatively new CEO Jim Cornelius would finally do his first TV interview since taking over the company last year.

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    I don't know how they all got clustered together--maybe so many of the major pharmaceutical companies meet with Wall Street in early December so everyone can then take off on long vacations--but my hands are full with three big pharma events in as many days. Yesterday, Merck put out guidance.