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  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said focusing on cutting the budget deficit now would jeopardize economic growth at a time when jobs are starting to be created, but even if that occurs, the unemployment rate will stay high for "a long period of time." Bruce Kasman, chief U.S. economist at JPMorgan, discussed his views.

  • Stocks ended a strong quarter with a thud Wednesday after a disappointing report on jobs from ADP.

  • Now that the markets closed 4% or higher for the quarter, a positive first quarter is a good indication for the year where historically the Dow, S&P and NASDAQ Composite have managed to post average gains of more than 12% in the year when Q1 was a positive quarter versus average losses of -0.2% or greater when Q1 was negative.

  • RIM Headquarters

    This wasn't the way it was supposed to play out. There was every indication that Research in Motion was supposed to be sitting pretty, effectively shaking off the effects of iPhone from Apple and still enjoying big time momentum in the marketplace. Nope.

  • Stocks turned mixed Wednesday, the last trading day of the quarter. Energy, financials and materials were the sector leaders.

  • As reports on the potential development of a new iPhone model for the Verizon network circulated yesterday, shares of Apple continued to rise, closing at yet another new all-time high.

  • Stocks opened lower Wednesday, the last trading day of the quarter, after a surprise drop in the ADP jobs report.

  • Stocks pulled off a gain Tuesday after a see-saw session in which techs and industrials gained, while energy and bank stocks were weak. Rob Morgan, chief investment strategist at Fulcrum Securities, and Alec Young, equity strategist at Standard & Poor’s, shared their market strategies.

  • Stocks pulled off a gain Tuesday after a see-saw session as techs and industrials gained, while energy and bank stocks were weak.

  • Stocks teetered in a narrow range on Tuesday. Analysts expect markets to be volatile the next two days as investors usually take part in window dressing — trades intended to boost returns on reports sent to shareholders — at the end of a quarter. Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services shared his market insights.

  • Nintendo DSi XL

    Nintendo has made a habi of tweaking its Nintendo DS handheld gaming system and re-releasing it. The upgrades typically goose consumer demand, and there was no reason to think the just-launched Nintendo DSi XL would be any different.

  • US Stocks rose for the third consecutive week, with the Dow halting its eight-session winning streak on Friday.

  • The American markets are reacting to the country’s problems the same way they did health care. Cramer explains why that is wrong.

  • Google shut its mainland Chinese-language portal on Monday and began rerouting searches to a Hong Kong site, over two months after it said it would not accept the self-censorship demanded by China's government. Mark Mahaney, Internet research director at Citigroup Investment Research, shared his insights on the search engine giant.

  • Austin, Texas

    Americans are spending less. Well, some Americans. Which city do you think has the most per capita spending on expenses? Newport Beach? Palm Beach? Greenwich?

  • Only a few hours left to game Round 2 of our Fast Money Madness Tournament. Voting ends at 10am Wednesday.

  • The first round of Fast Money Madness has ended and the results may surprise you. Find out who’s got game in this year’s competition!

  • Google China

    One of the most fascinating business and investing stories we’ve all been following is whether Google would follow through on its threat to shut down some or all of its operations in China.

  • Smartphones

    Companies at the CTIA Wireless 2010 show stand a far better chance of getting their news heard and their products noticed. And when it comes to real news, no other sector offers more tech headlines than wireless.

  • The House of Representatives may have passed the Senate's health care bill Sunday evening, but there have been mixed reactions among politicians and industry leaders. Both shared their interpretation of what the bill will mean for the nation's future with CNBC Monday.