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  • Stocks were lower Tuesday as investors waited to see if the Fed would take new actions to stimulate the economy. Jason Trennert, chief investment strategist at Strategas Research Partners, and Frederic Dickson, CIS and SVP at D.A. Davidson & Co., shared their outlooks.

  • Fewer companies are offering retirement benefits these days – and for the ones that do, many are scaling back their plans. “The old, traditionally-defined benefit-pension plan is pretty much gone,” said Milton Moskowitz, who’s been compiling an annual list of the “100 Best Companies to Work For” for more than 25 years. “Employees don’t seem to stay with companies a very long time. So companies don’t feel the need to offer the security to keep them there.” But even in this era of cost-cutting, th

    Even in this era of cost-cutting, there are still some companies offering great retirement plans. To give you a leg up on your research, here are 10 of the best.

  • Apartment buildings in Liaoning Province, China.

    China's success as an economy and the strength of its manufacturing sector has not translated into success of a homegrown brand into the global arena.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Tuesday's Squawk on the Street.

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    It may be too early to tell which toys parents will be hunting for this holiday season, but with Christmas just months away, there is already buzz building around Mattel's harmonizing plush characters, the Sing-a-ma-jigs. These critters and 14 other toys have made Toys 'R Us' "Fabulous 15."

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    And its stocks. 5 points on how stocks could double from here.

  • Why hedge funds are dead.

  • Halo Reach

    The West’s recent dominance in video games is spurring a growing group of Japanese game developers to ask a once-unthinkable question: can they learn from the West? The New York Times reports.

  • Stocks ended higher Friday, continuing a September rally despite trading with uncertainty most of the week.  Caterpill and United Technologies rose, HP and JP Morgan fell.

  • Halo - Reach

    Microsoft's "Halo: Reach" hit $200 million dollars in sales in just its first 24 hour on store shelves. That makes it the biggest debut of any movie or game so far this year. But how much will Microsoft actually make? And how does that compare to a blockbuster movie opening?

  • iPad

    That’s been the word on the web today, citing a story in the Wall Street Journal. The writer of that story says Best Buy CEO Brian Dunn told him iPad sales were snatching away up to 50% of laptop sales.

  • Stocks edged higher before the close Friday, putting the market on pace to continue a September rally despite trading with uncertainty most of the week.  Dupont and Caterpillar rose, JP Morgan and HP fell.

  • Halo Reach

    It's a great week for the video game industry — several pieces of positive news for investors in the game business. But despite the upbeat news, game stocks slid Thursday with Activision Blizzard down nearly 5%. So what happened?

  • Stocks are slightly higher after a burst at the open following news that a measure of consumer sentiment unexpectedly hit the lowest level in more than a year.  Dupont and Disney rose, HP fell.

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    As retailers begin to gear up for holiday 2010, the Wal-Mart and Amazon seem to be preparing for another price cutting battle, which could put pressure on GameStop shares in the fourth quarter.

  • An alarming survey by Credit Suisse should serve as a wake up call to the broadcast networks and media investors as well!

  • Out of the Dow 30 stocks, just 10 names really matter, said Nicholas Colas, chief market strategist at ConvergEx. He shared his insights.

  • If you think investor appetite for bonds is a sign we're looking at lost decade here in the US - think again!

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    Companies here in China’s industrial heartland are toiling to reinvent their businesses, fearing that the low-cost manufacturing that helped propel the nation’s economic ascent is fast becoming obsolete. The NYT reports.