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  • Some of the names on the move ahead of the open.

  • Stocks finished near session highs Monday, with the S&P 500 setting a record close and the Nasdaq ending at its best level since November 2000, following a better-than-expected pending home sales report and after Italy's new prime minister named his cabinet over the weekend.

  • A trader at the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE).

    The Fed is expected to repeat its dovish message in the coming week, which could provide a safety net for the market amid a big wave of earnings and the April jobs report.

  • Mike Baute

    Relationship Science founder Neal Goldman told CNBC his company has generated an actionable business Rolodex from mining publicly-available information.

  • 8-ways-to-avoid-financial-abuse-paper-trail.jpg

    The U.S. government's civil fraud lawsuit against S&P relies heavily on emails in which employees voiced doubts about the integrity of the agency's ratings. But S&P may still come out on top.

  • CNBC’s Analytics team looked at the stocks that have average consensus estimates farthest above their current stock prices. Here's what they found.

  • Moody's says its rival is under threat of crippling lawsuits, but Moody's may be in the same situation. TheStreet.com reports.

  • McGraw-Hill, which is being sued by the U.S. government for bond ratings issued by its S&P unit, reported a surge in quarterly adjusted profit and said it does not believe the government can prove its case.

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama's State of the Union speech Tuesday could drive market focus straight to the next skirmish in the budget and deficit battle with Congress, depending on his tone.

  • $5 Billion Fine A 'Drop in the Bucket': Expert

    Dennis Kelleher, CEO of Better Markets, tells CNBC why a $5 billion fine would be the least S&P deserve for their fraudulent AAA ratings which helped cause the financial crash.

  • Cramer’s Earnings Game Plan for Next Week

    Think the past week was busy? Wait until you get a load of what’s on Cramer’s radar for this week.

  • Shares in credit rating agency Moody's fell sharply on Friday as it faces a possible federal fraud lawsuit over its pre-crisis debt ratings.

  • Some of the names on the move ahead of the open.

  • Moody's, which could face a federal lawsuit tied to pre-crisis ratings, reported a 66 percent jump in quarterly profit as it benefited from a wave of debt issues.

  • The U.S. Justice Department and multiple states are discussing also suing Moody's for defrauding investors, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • A New Idea on How to Fix the Ratings Agencies

    "Many of the practices you're seeing in DOJ's lawsuit are still going on. They're still selling out," said Jules Kroll, CEO of Kroll Bond Ratings, a New York-based ratings agency.

  • Standard and Poor's has hired John Keker, one of the country's top white-collar defense attorneys, to help fight a $5 billion lawsuit brought by the U.S. government this week.

  • The Standard and Poor's Files

    CNBC's Scott Cohn reports on the $5 billion complaint filed by the Justice Department against Standard and Poor's and the role of internal emails in the case. Henry Blodget, Business Insider CEO and editor-in-chief, weighs in.

  • Stocks finished higher Tuesday, wiping out most of the previous session's losses, boosted by a batch of encouraging earnings reports and positive economic data from Europe.

  • The U.S. government has launched a civil lawsuit against Standard & Poor's over mortgage bond ratings, the first federal enforcement action against a credit rating agency over behavior tied to the recent financial crisis.