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Stocks Nintendo Co Ltd

  • Stocks closed higher for the fourth straight session Friday after a better-than-expected jobs report gave investors another reason to think the U.S. economy is beginning to turn around. JP Morgan rose.

  • Stocks were heading to the best results for a week before Labor day since 2006 after a series of economic reports gave investors reason to think the U.S. economy is beginning to turn around.  JP Morgan rose and McDonald's fell.

  • Apple Store

    Apple might have shined its spotlight Wednesday on Apple TV and the new iPods, but at the same time, it had a clear message for the video game industry: We’re coming for you.

  • StarCraft 2

    Video game sales weren’t quite as bad as some analysts were expecting in July, but the industry once again failed to match its performance of last year.

  • StarCraft 2

    The holiday season can’t get here quickly enough for video game publishers. July sales number for the industry will be released roughly two hours after the market closes Thursday – and analysts expect good news to be in short supply. Consensus is fairly wide this month, but the year over year drop in sales is expected to be between 7.5 percent and 15 percent.

  • Halo Reach

    A new study from Economists Incorporated reports that the video game industry added $4.95 billion to the U.S. Gross Domestic Product last year—and the entertainment side of the software world is growing considerably faster than other segments of the economy.

  • Retired couple

    Baby Boomers want to live longer and to live better. The convergence of Boomer expectations and technology is forging a disruptive force that will improve life tomorrow for everyone.

  • Madden 11

    “Madden” is one of the few annual titles that has a long tail in stores. Traditionally, there’s a big push for the game when it’s released, then another sales bump as the holidays (and NFL playoffs) draw near.

  • netflix_ps3_200.jpg

    Microsoft has known for a while that the trick to getting the Xbox 360 integrated into people’s living rooms is to load it with non-gaming features. It’s a strategy that was worked well for the company.... Now, though, Sony is quickly following suit...which could give it an advantage as the industry prepares for a crucial holiday season.

  • Wii

    The attempts of Sony and Microsoft to replicate the success of Nintendo's Wii gaming system has been met with lukewarm reception, CNBC.com's Chris Morris reports.

  • Super Mario Galaxy 2

    Analysts and industry observers were expecting June’s video game sales numbers to be pretty awful. Unfortunately, they were right.

  • summer_santa_200.jpg

    Santa may be off sunning himself on the beach, but inside some retail outlets it's beginning to look a lot like Christmas. And why not, there are only 164 shopping days left until the big day.

  • Microsoft

    Microsoft should look at spinning off its consumer businesses—an $11 billion-a-year, red-ink-stained amalgam—and refocusing on its real core: internal software and the apps that run on it.

  • Screen capture of "Red Dead Redemption"

    After a surprising—and staggeringly bad—April, the video game industry showed fledgling signs of life in May—but nothing that’s going to cause investors to cheer. Take Two Interactive Software, though, may finally have a hit franchise that will divert investor focus away from “Grand Theft Auto”.

  • 2010 E3 Electronic Expo

    Hardware announcements tend to get the lion's share of the spotlight at E3, but in the long run, all of those devices are just tools.  The real stars of the show are the titles that publishers have on display.

  • Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect, a gesture-recognition controller – a camera that is able to detect subtle movements and sounds from players.

    While the video game industry has its share of problems, complacency is not one of them.

  • As it does every four or five years, the video game industry is rebooting itself this year. Instead of rolling out brand new game systems for the living room, though, manufacturers are looking to build on the market they’ve already created. “The video game sector is nearing a turning point, with the potential for new hardware innovations and a strong development pipeline to reinvigorate growth,” says Colin Sebastian, an analyst with Lazard Capital Markets. There was a lot of new hardware and tec

    Instead of rolling out brand new game systems for the living room, though, manufacturers are looking to build on the market they’ve already created.

  • Xbox 360

    Video game makers love their core audience — men 18 to 40 who obsessively follow, buy, and play violent action games — but it's a finite one. Now game makers are looking much broader, to women and kids. The consoles are already in millions of Americans living rooms: now software makers just need to convince other members of gamers' families to spend on game software.

  • Wii

    Nintendo kicked off its big E3 event with America CEO Reggie Fils-Aime singing the praises of the Wii and the DS. But the keynote comes amid multiple threats to the Nintendo juggernaut, from the likes of Microsoft and Apple. And how Nintendo responds, and how quickly, will determine whether its best days are behind it, or still ahead.

  • onlive_200.jpg

    As Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo promote their upcoming hardware innovations, a burgeoning company called OnLive sits on the show floor of the video game industry’s trade show, sending out the message that dedicated game machines could be a thing of the past.