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Stocks 21st Century Fox Class A

  • Online social networking may not be living up to its hype. Is it time to get short?

  • Today we received his eyes in the mail!! IT'S GOOD TO BE KING...OF ALL MEDIA Looks like Big Media is not suffering from an economic downturn (except for Time Warner). Steve Wonsiewicz runs Fresearch.

  • Stocks started the week off higher, led by financials and technology stocks. RIMM and MBIA rose, while HP declined.

  • Stocks started the week off higher as the dollar rose to a two-month high and oil receded. MBIA bounced despite reporting an astouding quarterly loss.

  • Cablevision Systems sealed a $650 million deal to buy 97 percent of Newsday Media Group from Tribune, the companies said Monday, after Rupert Murdoch's News Corp withdrew its bid.

  • Back in 1957, Disneyland opened up a Jetsons-esque "Home of the Future" featuring all sorts of far-out gadgets like microwaves (!) and giant TVs (!). Some of them became realities in every American home. Others, like the floating furniture, well... Now, Disney is taking a whole new approach to the idea. I got a sneak peak at Disneyland's "Innoventions Dream Home," which opens in Tomorrowland on June 16.

  • News Corp.'s headquarters in New York.

    News Corp. is benefiting from its global diversity and a strong TV business, and it doesn't seem to be hurt by the U.S. economy's downturn. And now, investors are saying the stock is undervalued.

  • News Corp.

    Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. said its quarterly net profit rose on higher advertising sales at the Fox TV network and Fox News Channel, as well as a one-time gain from its stock swap with Liberty Media.

  • Stocks declined as soaring oil prices triggered concerns about inflation and consumer spending.

  • News Corporation

    News Corp raised its guidance earlier this year, so now the big question facing the company is whether, in the face of an economic slowdown, it'll be able to live up to those higher expectations.

  • On Monday, the first day of our on-air coverage following the collapse of the Microsoft/Yahoo negotiations, we were rife with speculation about what, if anything, Microsoft might do next. We talked about every possibility: News Corp. and Microsoft blending their online businesses with Microsoft relying heavily on the MySpace property;

  • The drip, drip of rising oil prices could start to wear on stocks, but traders point out that the market has been fairly resilient and is still raring to go higher.

  • Disney reports earnings Tuesday while News Corp reports Wednesday. Which company should you bet on?

  • Yahoo

    Barely two hours into trading and Yahoo shares were on the decline in a big way, off about $4.50 a share, or almost 20 percent; while Microsoft shares are on the increase. Both stocks are well off their lows and highs of the morning, however, as investors try to figure out what they'll both do next. If anything. They will do something. But what?

  • Yahoo! co-founder Jerry Yang smiles as he watches the Stanford basketball game against Washington State, Thursday, March 3, 2005 in Stanford, Calif. Yahoo! celebrated their 10th anniversary this week. David Filo and Yang founded Yahoo! as doctoral students at Stanford. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

    Yahoo's shares tumbled after Microsoft withdrew its $47.5 billion takeover offer, wiping out about $7.6 billion in market value and piling pressure on its leadership, especially CEO Jerry Wang.

  • Yahoo!'s headquarters in California.

    Now that Microsoft has withdrawn it's bid, the pressure is on Yahoo to prove it can revive its languishing stock price.

  • microsoft_yahoo.jpg

    A chronology of events leading to Microsoft's  decision to abandon its offer for Web search and advertising competitor Yahoo:

  • microsoft_yahoo.jpg

    "We continue to believe that our proposed acquisition made sense for Microsoft, Yahoo! and the market as a whole," said Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

  • Don't be surprised if some of the market's next moves will be to pull back a bit, as investors consider whether stocks are running too fast. But that said, there are still a lot of investors ready to load and fire when it comes to the stock market -- and there could be some healthy buying in the week ahead.

  • Yahoo_headquarters_HQ.jpg

    Microsoft, hoping to salvage a takeover of Yahoo, has reluctantly agreed to boost its offer to about $33 a share in cash and stock from $31, though Yahoo is holding out for $37, sources have told CNBC.