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  • Steve Jobs

    The news business can be an ugly business sometimes. Just ask Apple and its CEO Steve Jobs—the subject of an erroneous obituary report Thursday. We in the news business sensationalize, we rationalize, we sanitize, we get things wrong, and sometimes we stick with stories far too long. But the ugly little truth is that the news business can actually (mis-)manage the news itself...

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    Stocks rose on Thursday as another decline in the price of oil buoyed hopes that consumer spending will recover. Also financial shares bounced back from a sharp two-day sell-off.

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    When Google's Gmail service went dark last night for about 90 minutes, cutting off millions of users from their email, it shone a bright light on the promise--and problems--of so-called Cloud Computing.

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    In today's end-of-week version of the exclusive Fast Money Web Extra of trades not covered on the show, the gang mentions some good trades for the start of next week.

  • After introducing guest trader Zach Karabell, aka "The Academic," the gang immediately dives into the main lesson learned after stocks soar to end the week (the highest close since June). The dollar also "exploded," with its biggest jump in 8 years against the euro. "Currencies typically do not move like that," says Dylan of the USD's 3.3% gain this week. The S&P 500 also had its best week since April, due in part to the commodities pullback -- it ended the day up 2.4%.

  • The S&P 500 has moved further into positive territory led by tech giants.  Here's what they are contributing. 

  • And Oracle. As the CEO explains, none of the company's peers can compete.

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    In Tuesday’s Web Extra the traders reveal how to play Oracle now that Larry Ellison has fired another round in his allegations of corporate theft against rival SAP.

  • The Lightning Round is extended in this CNBC.com exclusive feature.

  • SAP

    SAP posted solid second-quarter results despite global economic turmoil and gave an upbeat 2008 outlook, sending shares in the world's biggest business software maker more than 6 percent higher on Tuesday.

  • Oracle's headquarters in California.

    Oracle amended its lawsuit against SAP on Monday, saying SAP executive board members were warned that its TomorrowNow unit was engaged in corporate theft before SAP bought TomorrowNow.

  • Stop Trading begins with a discussion of deterioration in the market at the end of the trading day, and directs much of the blame to banks. There are a few lights at the end of the tunnel.

  • Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    The week was a mixed bag of economic and market news, most of it on the negative side.  Oil prices continued to hit record highs, the market officially entered bear territory and the European Central Bank socked it to the U.S. by raising rates a quarter-point.  Despite all of this, CNBC guests found bright spots in steel, financials, tech and international stocks.

  • Conservative spending and high productivity have helped tech stocks thrive in a weak economy, said Scott Kessler, director of the Information Technology Research Group at Standard & Poor's.

  • Tech stocks were believed to be immune to the troubles vexing this market. But RIMM, Google and other Street-hearts sold-off this week. How should you trade it?

  • Bill Gates

    Today's the day. Well sort of. Bill Gates will retire from Microsoft, kind of. He's leaving the day-to-day responsibilities to others. But not really.

  • Stocks could continue to let off steam at the open Friday.

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    Who needs theme park thrill rides when you’ve got Wall Street. The Dow tumbled by 358 points after oil climbed to $140 for the first time ever. What's the "Word on the Street?"

  • The Dow closed at its lowest level in nearly two years after a downgrade on brokerage stocks and a slew of weak earnings and economic reports.  Several Dow components and several financial stocks hit multiyear lows, with the biggest shock coming from GM, which fell to its lowest in more than 50 years.

  • There is a change in sentiment as traders are trying to get their hands around the extent of the slowdown in global growth. New issues for the market: --global growth slowing.