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Stocks Sprint Nextel Corp

  • Qualcomm has nothing to do with making Apple's iPhone, but the chief executive officer of the world's No. 2 cell phone chipmaker said Thursday that he has plenty to gain.

  • Angel Cabrera

    The man they call "The Duck," Angel Cabrera, was one of two players who finished under par after the first round of the U.S. Open on Thursday. But oddsmakers didn't respect the 37-year-old, who had a previous U.S. Open high of a seventh place finish in 2001 and missed three of seven cuts in PGA Tour events this year. That's why on Friday morning, if you had a hunch for Cabrera, you could have dropped $100 to won north of $2,500 on Sunday. Wanted to wait until Sunday morning?

  • Retail investors looking to jump back into the stock market may find it difficult to find out where to even begin given the wealth of mutual funds and ETFs out there.  And even those comfortable with fund-based portfolios may want to explore the field of individual stocks, which are riskier than fund but also potentially more rewarding.

  • A U.S. District Judge might have denied NASCAR's request to stay an injunction that allowed the Cingular logo on Jeff Burton's car to be replaced with an AT&T logo, but NASCAR got a victory yesterday when Alltel agreed to a $25 billion private equity buyout. Let's go back and put this in context for you. NASCAR obviously did not want the AT&T brand on the track because it wasn't one of the brands that were grandfathered in when the governing body signed a 10-year, $700 million deal with Nextel to be the official telecommunications company of NASCAR. But consolidation in this industry is very common -- Sprint soon bought Nextel and AT&T bought Cingular.

  • There was a time when this telco name was synonymous with disgrace - not anymore.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • U.S. rural wireless telecoms service provider Alltel is being pursued by at least three groups of private-equity buyers about a potential purchase, the Wall Street Journal said on its Web site on Wednesday.

  • Stocks closed higher and the Dow ended at another record high, buoyed by sharp gains in financial and telecom stocks. "With strong earnings and reasonable valuations, you should expect stocks to go higher," said Ed Keon, chief investment strategist at Prudential. "I think the market represents good value."

  • Sprint Nextel, the third-biggest U.S. mobile phone service, posted a quarterly loss and a fall in subscribers who pay monthly bills, adding to worries that the company was losing market share to rivals.

  • Sometimes the best way to reinvigorate your love for investing is to gamble on a few speculative stocks. Tonight, Cramer shares three ponies he thinks are ready to run.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • The contract winners, who beat out Sprint Nextel, now have to compete with each other for the telecom needs of various federal agencies.

  • AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and Qwest are all waiting by the phone for a call on a $20 billion government contract. But only one will get it, and that means only one stock should jump when it happens. In this segment, Cramer explains who stands to gain the most from a win.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Remember last week when Cramer told you to wait on financials until they all reported? Well, they have. Here’s how to play them and more next week.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Will they or won't they? The net is rife with speculation now that Google plans to enter the wireless business with a free, advertising-supported cell phone that the company would sell, using wi-fi AND cell technology. Not just with new apps, but with the actual hardware.

  • Today Cramer talks drilling stocks, MasterCard, Sprint and many, many more...

  • Alltel has stepped up efforts to sell itself to carriers such as AT&T, Verizon Communications and Sprint Nextel, said people familiar with the matter, as the Little Rock, Ark.-based wireless company tries to chart a new future, The Wall Street Journal reported.

  • A number of companies report earnings next week, including Gap, Sprint, Viacom, Foster Wheeler and Dynegy. This is where Cramer shows you how to play the field.

  • Stocks closed mixed  after another see-saw day as technology shares got a huge boost from Apple Computer.

  • Sprint Nextel shares fell as much as 11% after the company gave a tepid outlook for 2007 and disappointing fourth-quarter subscriber numbers.

  • There seems to be a new wave of "hacker attacks"--aimed at your cell phones and BlackBerrys. But is there any way to protect yourself? On Today’s "Street Signs," Erin Burnett asked  Ed English, with internet security firm Trend Micro and Anne Wallace from The Identity Theft Assistance Center. Ed English explained that hackers who break into computers are now targeting cell phones and mobile devices - anywhere that we’re storing personal information.