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Stocks Siemens AG

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    This morning President Obama received this letter from 50 of the largest global companies which have subsidaries in the U.S. applauding his recent comments on the economic benefits of foregin direct investment in the United States.

  • The Fast traders are concerned that headlines about Greece have eclipsed sobering commentary from Siemens, widely considered a bellwether for Germany’s economy.

  • A sometimes under-skilled workforce  and shortage of job training is compounding unemployment at home, while technological innovation and product development is paying off abroad.   

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    A mismatch in the US labour market between the skills of unemployed people and the jobs available is making it hard for some companies to find the right staff despite an unemployment rate of more than 9 percent, one of the country’s largest manufacturing employers has warned, the Financial Times reports.

  • VirnetX is shaping up to be the next big tech battleground stock. As with all battleground stocks, this one has a great story. In a nutshell: It makes security software for 4G phones. If all goes well, based on everything the company and its promoters say, every 4G wireless manufacturer will need to license its technology.

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

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    Companies in the wind power industry are gearing up for expansion, despite hurdles such as decreasing demand for electricity and lower natural gas prices.

  • Siemens' U.S. Investment

    Siemens Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, has announced it intends to hire 3,000 people in the United States, and that a percentage of those jobs will be reserved for returning veterans. Eric Spiegel, CEO, Siemens Corporation, explains the company's plans.

  • Southwest Airlines planes

    The latest near-tragedy involving a Southwest jet is prompting new questions about the federal government's role in the aviation industry and whether the airlines should be nationalized, as they are in some other countries.

  • Larry Fink

    The BlackRock CEO isn't surprised by the recent climb higher in U.S. equities, as the asset class remains "very cheap," Fink told CNBC Thursday.

  • Traders tell me stock markets are down in Europe today over fears about how its world class exporters could be hit by rising oil prices, specifically in emerging markets.

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    Beijing’s push for innovation have encouraged the rise of domestic players, arguably at the expense of foreign ones. A CNBC contributor tells us what China needs to do to retain foreign investment.

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    With the first mass-scale electric vehicles rolling off US car lots, companies big and small  are developing charging systems and outlets.

  • General Electric, the parent company of CNBC, recently increased its dividend payment for the second time this year. With $20 million in cash on the balance sheet and the sell-off of its NBC Universal unit expected to meet government approvals, is now the time to buy? Nicholas Heymann of Sterne, Agee & Leach, and Ted Parrish of Henssler Equity Fund say yes.

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    The banking profession is losing its shine and young people may be better off choosing jobs such as engineering, science or technical, various experts told CNBC.

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

  • Health care protestor.

    Congress will tweak but not repeal health care legislation, insurers won't take a bit hit from reform measures, sector consolidation will continue and China will drive growth for drug and device makers.

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    Corporations appear to have fewer questions than lawmakers about how climate change will alter how the world uses energy and natural resources, and are actively pursuing technologies they expect will give them a leg up in an economy less dependent on fossil fuels.

  • Stocks closed down Thursday soon after Walt Disney released worse-than-expected results into a market already weakened by disappointing results from Cisco and a rise in the dollar as European debt troubles continued to roil currency markets.  Cisco and Disney fell, Chevron rose.

  • Stocks declined ahead of the close Thursday, as Walt Disney released worse-than-expected results into a market already weakened by disappointing results from Cisco and a rise in the dollar as European debt troubles continued to roil currency markets.  Cisco and Disney fell.