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  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

  • The country’s telcos have growth that AT&T and Verizon just don’t.

  • The Dow squeaked out a gain Wednesday after the Fed renewed its pledge to keep rates low and offered a statement with no surprises.

  • Landon Donovan celebrates after beating Algeria in their 2010 World Cup Group C first round match in Tshwane/Pretoria.

    Landon Donovan scores in stoppage time against Algeria this morning and the United States advances to the next round in the World Cup. So who are the big winners besides the US team themselves?

  • The Federal Reserve's Open Market Committee is expected to issue its latest decision on interest rates and the US economy this afternoon. Paul Schatz, president of Heritage Capital, discussed his insights ahead of the event.

  • Apple iPhone 4

    The iPhone 4 is slimmer, with an improved screen and audio. But it was a hit before the public knew that. The NYT reports.

  • Tiger Woods

    Tiger Woods' loss of endorsement income cost his management company IMG $4.6 million in fees, according to a confidential document reviewed by CNBC. The document provides the most comprehensive financial look into the powerful, but private, sports management company in its 50-year history.

  • fingers_typing2_200.jpg

    The FCC hosted an open hearing today to discuss how to seek the best legal framework for Internet regulation — the commission voted 3 to 2 to continue the re-regulation process. It's now moving closer to Chairman Julius Genachowski's proposal for a "third way," a selection of some of the stricter rules now regulating telecom.

  • The Dow erased its gains after a higher open on Thursday as another rise in jobless claims weighed on the market. Maury Fertig, chief investment officer at Relative Value Partners and Chip Cobb, senior vice president at Bryn Mawr Trust discussed their outlooks.

  • Stocks ended a rocky session flat Wednesday as a drop in housing starts and disappointing outlook from FedEx offset a strong industrial-production report. BP shares rose after the company agreed to halt its dividend.

  • fedex_truck_oq_3.jpg

    Earnings have topped expectations since the year began but a disappointing outlook from FedEx raised concern that more companies may follow. Is it a sign that a double-dip is coming?

  • Stocks recovered as techs rose and after a report that BP had agreed to place about $20 billion in escrow to pay claims resulting from the oil spill.

  • With stocks falling on lower-than-expected housing starts and FedEx's disappointing outlook, is it time to buy into the market weakness? Marc Pado, U.S. market strategist at Cantor Fitzgerald and Michelle Girard, senior economist at RBS shared their market outlooks.

  • Stocks rallied Tuesday as the euro gained against the dollar after a number of successful European debt auctions eased investor concerns about the euro zone's solvency crisis. Techs and industrials led the advance.

  • apple_ipad_hands_140.jpg

    One has to wonder whether Apple will start to create a mobile tablet product for the enterprise space.

  • AT&T Communications corporate offices at 175 East Houston St. in San Antonio.

    Investors of AT&T are best served receiving dividends—a practice that does not hinder the company’s ability to re-invest in the business or commit to M&A—Randall Stephenson, chairman, president and CEO of the giant telecom, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Randall Stephenson, Chairman, President and CEO of AT&T, Inc.

    AT&T service issues stem from exploding "data volumes," which are up 5000 percent in three years, according to Randall Stephenson.

  • Stocks rallied Tuesday as the euro gained against the dollar after a number of successful European debt auctions eased investor concerns about the euro-zone's solvency crisis. Techs and industrials led the advance.

  • Starbucks

    Many coffee shops try to discourage people from buying a cup of coffee and then lingering for hours to use the free Internet access. Starbucks will soon encourage them to stay as long as they want. The NYT reports.

  • onlive_200.jpg

    As Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo promote their upcoming hardware innovations, a burgeoning company called OnLive sits on the show floor of the video game industry’s trade show, sending out the message that dedicated game machines could be a thing of the past.