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Stocks Wells Fargo & Co

  • After hours, investors poured over comments from FedEx as they tried trying to determine how the company's revised outlook could influence Tuesday’s trading.

  • Both the Dow and S&P 500 clung to modest gains on Friday after shooting much higher on a stronger-than expected jobs report.

  • Bank of America sold $19 billion of common equivalent securities in a move to repay money it received from the U.S. government's TARP. Is it time for investors to buy into the big banks? Matt McCormick, banking analyst and portfolio manager of Bahl & Gaynor Investment Counsel, shared his views and his stock picks.

  • On the surface Friday's strong jobs number seems like a welcome sign. But underneath it could signal trouble for the market.

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    A day after Bank of America announced that it would repay its federal bailout money, Citigroup and Mr. Pandit, its chief executive, were left in the uncomfortable position of being the last of the Wall Street giants to remain tethered to the state, the New York Times reported.

  • Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • A quiet range-bound day ended in the red in the last half hour of trading. What happened? Don't kid yourself--trading was execrable all day: there were almost no bids on the floor. Big names like IBM and Alcoa all dropped in the last half hour.

  • Goldman Sachs may be the canary in the coal mine. And it looks like it’s breaking support. What must you know to trade this market?

  • With BofA announcing plans to replay TARP and and sell $18.8 billion in preferred stock, how should you game this stock?

  • CNBC’s Charlie Gasparino tells the desk that Bank of America is going to repay $45 billion and get out of the TARP program.

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    We asked you to vote on the big winners and losers of 2009.  In the results of our poll—100,000 votes were cast—there were a few close votes, some decidedly one-sided ones and a couple surprise outcomes. And, there were a handful of big losers and big winners.

  • Foreclosed Home

    Faced with sluggish progress in its foreclosure-prevention effort, the Obama administration will spend the coming weeks cracking down on mortgage companies that aren't doing enough to help borrowers at risk of losing their homes.

  • Every bull market owes its success to a select group of stocks and sectors at the forefront of the move. Owning them is a great path to profits. Here’s how it’s done.

  • New York Stock Exchange, lower Manhattan, New York City.

    A week's worth of economic reports has been crunched into just three days this week, and Wednesday has its share of significant data, which include jobless claims, durable goods and consumer sentiment.

  • Stocks closed lower after revised government data showed the economy grew at a slower-than-expected pace in the third quarter. How should you be positioned, now?

  • Has the financial sector stabilized—and if so, how can investors put their money to work? Jeffery Harte, managing director in equity research at Sandler O’Neill, and David Trone, managing director at Fox-Pitt, Kelton, discussed their outlook for the banks.

  • Despite the negative spin, there’s reason to feel good about this sector. Plus, his favorite stock in the group.

  • In what appears to be a bet consumers will stick with discount retailers even after the economy rebounds, Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway increased its Wal-Mart holdings by almost 90 percent during the summer.  It added almost 18 million shares, currently worth almost $1 billion, in the third quarter.

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    Warren Buffett tells CNBC that Berkshire Hathaway hasn't added to its stock holdings of American Express "in years."  That's in response to a statement made by biographer Alice Schroeder in the just-published paperback edition of The Snowball.

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    Green or sustainability is now such a broad and deep subject, so multi-dimensional, that even the most aware and informed have trouble keeping up. At the same time, some still don't get it, and in that way green is a bit fuzzy. There's nothing fuzzy about carbon, however. It's as old as the world as we know it and the core of our energy supply.