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Stocks Wal-Mart Stores Inc

  • The technology sector has outperformed the retailers this year by almost 20 percent. Is there still upside potential or should investors start looking elsewhere? Rob Enderle, principal analyst of Enderle Group, and Patricia Edwards, CIO of Storehouse Partners, shared their investment strategies.

  • After hours, the traders sifted through results from Mosaic in an attempt to glean more information about the ag trade. How should you play this space?

  • Wal-Mart shares have stalled since having an early runup last year. John Lawrence, senior analyst at Morgan Keegan, offered investors his outlook for the retail giant.

  • McDonald's Meal

    Three new stories may offer hope for the class warfare that has run roughshod over our national psyche of late: a Cadbury descendant called Kraft that "American plastic cheese company", Michael Moore's "Capitalism" movie flopped, and the Louvre is opening a McDonald's.

  • Stocks ended lower Friday as a dismal jobs report capped a string of disappointing economic reports this week, which cast doubt on the recovery. It was the market's second straight down week in which stocks have lost more than 3 percent.

  • They looked like hot stocks. So how are the traders playing Hologic, Melco and more now that they've been burned?

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    Plus, get calls on Friday's jobs number, tech, retail and more.

  • Stocks tried to push higher Friday as the dollar's retreat helped the market but investors remained worried about the recovery in the wake of some disappointing economic reports.

  • Surveillance Camera

    Asda—owned by Wal-Mart —has begun broadcasting live footage on the internet from cameras located at facilities that the average member of the public would otherwise never see. Good idea or not?

  • Stocks opened lower Friday after a report showed job losses were far worse than expected in September. Is this the beginning of a market correction? David Spika, VP and investment strategist at WHG Funds and Michael Yoshikami, president and chief investment strategist at YCMNET Advisors and CNBC contributor shared their insights.

  • Stocks opened lower Friday after disappointing reports on jobs and manufacturing.

  • Stock index futures plunged as September nonfarm payroll declines were far worse than Wall Street estimates.

  • The third quarter has past and for investors seeking dividends, they can be glad.  Standard & Poor's said yesterday that third-quarter dividend increases this year were the worst on record. Dividend payments during the third quarter fell 44.8% from a year ago, with only 191 of about 7,000 public companies -tracked by S&P- increasing their payouts.

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    The People’s Republic, that is. Funny, a bunch of Marxists are doing Adam Smith better than we can.

  • Following are the day’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of Constellation Brands and Time Warner popped while Smithfield Foods and Morgan Stanley dropped.

  • Parents shop in the toy aisle at a Target store, Kingston, Massachusetts

    Toy retailers and makers plan to make the best of it by offering more deals and cut-price versions of more expensive toys that they hope will spur parents to spend even if they're scrimping elsewhere. Two influential lists of expected hot holiday toys show only one over $100.

  • The Yankee Years

    There's usually plenty of buzz when a big sports book comes out, but it's rare that we ever follow up and find out how that book did.

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    Retailers, take a cue from Wal-Mart Stores: Shoppers will again be making a list and checking it twice this holiday season. A fresh survey from The Nielsen Company forecasts holiday sales to be flat with last year's dismal results.

  • Warner Brothers

    The movie industry has been ruled by very specific rules about how and when different home video formats are released. The idea is that home video -- DVDs and video-on-demand -- has to come out long enough after a theatrical film release to keep moviegoers driving to movie theaters and paying for tickets.

  • Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor’s shared his market insights.