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Mary Thompson

CNBC Reporter

Mary Thompson joined CNBC in 2000 as a general assignment reporter. She has covered a wide range of stories for CNBC, including the 2008 financial crisis, Hurricane Katrina from along the Gulf Coast and the mutual fund industry's market-timing scandal in 2003.

Thompson has reported extensively on the banking and insurance industries, executive pay and the stock market from the New York Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ MarketSite. She also appears on NBC's "Today" and "Weekend Nightly News."

In 2010, Thompson received a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism for breaking news coverage of the Bernard Madoff scandal. In 2005, she received a National Headliner Award for her reporting on price fixing in the insurance industry.

Prior to joining CNBC, Thompson worked for Bloomberg Television and Bloomberg Radio, from 1992 to 2000, covering the stock market from the New York Stock Exchange and anchoring special coverage of Federal Reserve meetings. She also worked as a print reporter for Bloomberg, from 1991 to 1992, covering small banks and retailers.

Before joining Bloomberg, Thompson worked at Fidelity Investments in a variety of sales positions.

Thompson holds a B.A. in English from the University of Notre Dame and an M.S. in journalism from Columbia University.

Follow Mary Thompson on Twitter @MThompsonCNBC.

More

  • Ireland's Economy Gets a Lift From Notre Dame Friday, 31 Aug 2012 | 10:24 AM ET

    This weekend, 35,000 Americans football fans descend on Dublin, Ireland. The reason? The Emerald Isle Classic, better known as the Notre Dame-Navy game. The game is not only the 86th time these two college football programs have faced off against each other, it is also a major economic event for Ireland's sluggish economy.

  • SIGTARP Report: AIG Will Be Tough to Regulate Wednesday, 25 Jul 2012 | 12:03 AM ET

    Almost four years after the government spent $161 billion dollars to rescue AIG, and management has spent countless hours restructuring it, a report by the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or SIGTARP, concludes the insurance giant is still too big and complicated to regulate.

  • Goldman CEO Warns on Fiscal Cliff, Urges Compromise Wednesday, 18 Jul 2012 | 5:33 PM ET
    Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein

    Lloyd Blankfein pointed to the uncertainty in the nation's capital as a major drag on the world economy.