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Bob Pisani

CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has reported on Wall Street and the stock market from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for more than a decade. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before moving to the New York Stock Exchange in 1997.

He was nominated twice for a "CableACE Award"—in 1993 and 1995.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Bob was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Commodities Still Under Pressure Thursday, 23 Oct 2008 | 9:34 AM ET

    S&P futures moved about 40 points off their highs of the morning, before posting a slight rebound off the lows late in the morning. They are finishing the morning session only down slightly.

  • Trader Talk: UPS on Deck; Amazon Hit Wednesday, 22 Oct 2008 | 9:08 PM ET

    The problem for UPS may be in its Q4 guidance—don’t be surprised if it's lower than the roughly $0.96 expected due to expected lower volume.

  • Commodities Help Bring New Lows For NASDAQ, S&P Wednesday, 22 Oct 2008 | 4:53 PM ET

    Though it was another disappointing day, note that the Dow was down 690 points at 3:40 PM ET and then rallied 170 points into the close. The S&P 500 and the NASDAQ closed at new lows. Despite all the worries about redemptions and forced selling, volume was notably light until the last 45 minutes. It really was more of a buyers' strike as bids simply got cancelled.

Featured

  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Wall Street