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Bob Pisani

CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has reported on Wall Street and the stock market from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for more than a decade. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before moving to the New York Stock Exchange in 1997.

He was nominated twice for a "CableACE Award"—in 1993 and 1995.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Bob was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Get Used To The Layoffs Wednesday, 10 Dec 2008 | 9:07 AM ET

    Commodity producer Rio Tinto up 20 percent pre-open, laying off 14,000 globally, reducing capital expenditures, and revise production expectations for copper, iron ore and aluminum downward.

  • Bad News Keeps Hammering Markets Tuesday, 9 Dec 2008 | 4:07 PM ET

    Toward the close, the indestructible Wal-Mart announced that they were suspending their stock repurchase program due to the economy and credit market instability. OK, it's not a big deal, there was only $5 billion left in the program to re-buy, and Target has already suspended their program, but it is emblematic of the problem.

  • What FedEx Is Telling Us Tuesday, 9 Dec 2008 | 12:08 PM ET

    FedEx's commentary are making a lot of the people in camp 2) move into camp 3), because they are implying that global demand is softer than expected a month ago, and getting worse, implying a longer period of bumping along the bottom than some anticipated.

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  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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