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Bob Pisani

CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has reported on Wall Street and the stock market from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for more than a decade. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before moving to the New York Stock Exchange in 1997.

He was nominated twice for a "CableACE Award"—in 1993 and 1995.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Bob was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Two pieces of positive news this morning: 1) Wal-Mart sales better than expected and raising guidance, and 2) Dow Chemicalspacer buying Rohm and Haas. Jobless claims lower than expected is also a help.

  • GE Is Next Data Point To Watch Wednesday, 9 Jul 2008 | 5:04 PM ET

    Now that Alcoa is out of the way, the next important data point is our parent network, General Electric,spacer which reports earnings on Friday. Since I'm often asked about the different divisions, here's a breakdown, with 2008 estimated revenues:

  • Bears Get "Wish": Selling Into Rallies Continues Wednesday, 9 Jul 2008 | 4:45 PM ET

    Financials give up all of Tuesday's gains; on top of that home builders, REITs, techs and retailers were also weak. The issues were again around the Government Sponsored Enterprises--Freddie Mac down 23 percent, Fannie Mae down 11 percent; as I noted before, the most likely concern is short sellers continuing to press the stocks on concerns over their exposure to mortgages vs. their capital base.

Featured

  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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