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Bob Pisani

CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has reported on Wall Street and the stock market from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for more than a decade. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before moving to the New York Stock Exchange in 1997.

He was nominated twice for a "CableACE Award"—in 1993 and 1995.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Bob was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Street Despair: No Visibility of Earnings Thursday, 9 Oct 2008 | 3:02 PM ET

    The markets are extremely oversold, but it can't muster a rally. Why not? The Fed is doing everything it can; it will undoubtedly soon start taking direction positions in financial companies, and may even guarantee loans between banks.

  • Traders Find Their New "Nirvana"? Thursday, 9 Oct 2008 | 1:04 PM ET

    Like junkies eager for the next fix, traders are applauding a short headline from the White House that Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson is "actively considering" capital injections into troubled U.S. banks.

  • S&P futures are up 19 points, and while many think this is because Treasury is actively shopping the idea they will take an ownership stake in U.S. banks, bear in mind that the market now routinely swings in 20 plus point ranges in a day, and often overnight, so futures up 15 is not even unusual any more.

Featured

  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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