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Bob Pisani

CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has reported on Wall Street and the stock market from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for more than a decade. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before moving to the New York Stock Exchange in 1997.

He was nominated twice for a "CableACE Award"—in 1993 and 1995.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Bob was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Shorting Commodities? Here's An Easier Way Thursday, 1 May 2008 | 1:33 PM ET

    Psst! Wanna short commodities? Deutsche Bank just made it a lot easier to do so, starting today. They are introducing two new Commodity ETNs, the Deutsche Bank Commodity Short ETN (DDP) ETN, and the Double Short (DEE) ETN.

  • Exxon: Highlighting Their Many Problems Thursday, 1 May 2008 | 11:39 AM ET

    Exxon came in light on top and bottom line. There are many problems. Here are the highlights: 1) Production share and contract. Exxon has contracts to take oil out of the ground with many countries. When oil prices go up sharply, the host government takes a bigger share of the profits.

  • The first of May is a day when a lot of people (including traders) are off all over the world (it's also the title of a very fine Bee Gees song, c. 1969). Futures dropped a bit as jobless claims were a bit stronger than expected; nonfarm payroll report is tomorrow.

Featured

  • A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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