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Steve Liesman

CNBC Senior Economics Reporter

As CNBC's senior economics reporter, Steve Liesman reports on all aspects of the economy, including the Federal Reserve and major economic indicators. He appears on "Squawk Box" (Monday-Friday, 6 a.m.-9 a.m. ET), as well as other CNBC programs throughout the business day.

Liesman joined CNBC from The Wall Street Journal where he served as a senior economics reporter covering monetary policy, international economics, academic research and productivity. At the Journal, Liesman previously worked as an energy reporter, and Moscow bureau chief. He won an Emmy for his coverage of the financial crisis and was a member of the reporting team recognized with a Pulitzer Prize for stories chronicling the crash of the Russian financial markets.

Prior to joining the Journal in 1994, Liesman was the business editor for The Moscow Times, where, as the founding business editor for the country's first English-language daily newspaper, he helped create the publication's stock index, which was the country's first. Liesman also has worked as a business reporter for both the St. Petersburg Times in St. Petersburg, Fla., and The Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Sarasota, Fla.

Liesman holds an M.S. from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a B.A. in English from the State University of New York, Buffalo.

Follow Steve Liesman on Twitter @steveliesman.

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