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Philip LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Philip J. LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Boeing Seeks New Heights in 2010 Tuesday, 11 May 2010 | 3:42 PM ET
    A Boeing 787 Dreamliner lands after its long-waited first flight.

    After years of planning, waiting, and yes, delaying some of the most important programs in its history, 2010 is the year when Boeing will see if it can finally deliver.

  • Toyota Swings to a Profit, Despite Recall Crisis Tuesday, 11 May 2010 | 9:44 AM ET
    Toyota headquarters

    Let's see if this makes sense. In the fiscal year that ended in March of 2009, Toyota lost $4.4 billion. A year later, after what was arguably the worst crisis in the company's history, Toyota swung to a profit of just over $2.2 billion. How did that happen?

  • Mr. Toyoda Gets the Message Monday, 10 May 2010 | 8:52 AM ET
    Ray LaHood, the transportation secretary.

    Four months after calling Toyota "safety deaf," Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood says the Japanese automaker is getting the message. "I think their attitude has changed," said Secretary LaHood after spending more than hour meeting with Toyota leaders including CEO Akio Toyoda. "I came away with the idea Mr. Toyoda has listened to us," said LaHood.

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