GO
Loading...

Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • New 'Smart' Car Technology Will Prevent Crashes Tuesday, 25 Jan 2011 | 2:26 PM ET

    A new technology designed to protect drivers from potentially deadly collisions and stop thousands of fender-benders is moving closer to being a standard part of every car and truck. In fact, it could be in every new car within the next five to six years.

  • ‘Talking’ Cars that Could Save Your Life Tuesday, 25 Jan 2011 | 10:39 AM ET
    Steering wheel

    Covering the auto industry I've seen some amazing technology over the years, but the latest crash avoidance system I tested in Detroit last week ranks among the most fascinating. It's called Intellidrive.

  • Gm Building

    They'll tell you in Detroit, being #1 isn't the most important thing. After all, it's profits not market share that matters. But you can bet GM wanted to pass up Toyota for the global sales title.

Featured

Contact Autos

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    › Learn More