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Philip LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Philip J. LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Big Three: Ready To Give Them A Second Chance? Thursday, 18 Jun 2009 | 9:54 AM ET
    Ford

    Could it be we Americans are ready to take a new look at the Big 3? A couple of data points coming out this week show good news for GM and Chrysler, and by extension of being a domestic auto maker, for Ford as well.

  • Should GM Change Its Name? Wednesday, 17 Jun 2009 | 9:41 AM ET
    General Motors

    It is an idea that has been floating around Detroit among those in the auto industry. Should General Motors change its name? When I first heard this question, I chuckled and thought, "Would it really be wise to throw out a well known name after 100 mostly successful years?"

  • Cash For Clunkers Program -  A Clunker? Tuesday, 16 Jun 2009 | 9:58 AM ET

    The bill would give people a voucher for $3,500 to $4,500 if they turn in their old car or truck for new fuel efficient model built in North America. On paper it sounds good. In reality, the number of people who may actually benefit from this program could be extremely limited.

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