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Philip LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Philip J. LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • GM Shareholders, Executives Run For Cover Tuesday, 12 May 2009 | 1:06 PM ET
    General Motors

    It's kind of like watching a car crash. You know it's sad. You know it's awful. But you can't stop looking at it. I'm not trying to be trivial about the plunge in GM shares this week.

  • Auto Bankruptcy 'Babies' About To Be Born Tuesday, 12 May 2009 | 8:41 AM ET
    Empty GM Dealership

    For months we've all heard the warnings. If GM and Chrysler go bankrupt it will trigger a host of other bankruptcies from suppliers to dealers.

  • The fact Toyota posted it's first annual loss in 75 years is not surprising- almost every auto maker lost money this year. The fact this company lost $6.9 Billion in the quarter ending this March is staggering, but not so out of line that people are shocked. What is surprising is Toyota CEO Katsuaki Watanabe telling reporters in Tokyo his company was "lacking in the scope and speed of dealing with various issues."

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