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Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Toyota's Prius Problem Wednesday, 3 Feb 2010 | 9:57 AM ET
    2010 Prius

    Ever since Toyota first addressed complaints about unintended acceleration last October, there have been a steady number of complaints from Prius owners. I've heard them from time to time and they basically amount to Prius owners saying their car suddenly sped up or the brakes didn't work properly.

  • Toyota Called ‘A Little Safety Deaf’ Tuesday, 2 Feb 2010 | 2:02 PM ET
    Toyota Dealership

    Today in Washington, Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood publicly blasted Toyota for being slow to react to concerns about its accelerators and unintended acceleration. LaHood said federal safety officials had to "wake them (Toyota) up" to the seriousness of the pedal issue.

  • Toyota headquarters

    The statement was straightforward with an appropriate amount of contrition. When I talked with Jim Lentz, the head of Toyota USA he was direct in admitting his company is embarrassed by the on-going controversy over sticking gas pedals.

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