GO
Loading...

Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • In the world of advancing the auto business, this doesn't rank up there with side curtain airbags in terms of importance. Heck, it's a change most people won't even notice. Still, Chrysler's decision to replace the bulky owner's manual with a DVD and small user's guide is one that a few folks out there will see as a no-brainer that is long overdue.

  • Plugged In: Electric Cars/Line-ups Charging Up Thursday, 17 Sep 2009 | 8:53 AM ET
    2010 Prius

    Every once in a while, you go to an auto show, and the future of the industry crystallizes before your eyes... ow there is another wave of vehicles that will drive the auto industry over the next 10-15 years. They are the electric, plug-in hybrids, and extended range electric cars.

  • Sergio Marchionne

    Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne candidly admits the troubled American auto maker was far weaker than expected when he finally took over as CEO. I caught up with him at the Frankfurt Auto Show, and he pulled no punches in assessing what he found at Chrysler when he became CEO.

Featured

Contact Autos

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    › Learn More