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Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Smart Move: Smart USA Latest to Add Leasing Friday, 15 Jan 2010 | 10:08 AM ET

    At face value, it is not the biggest story in the auto industry. But it is one more important sign the auto market is returning to health.

  • Yes! There Is a Growth Story in the Auto Business Thursday, 14 Jan 2010 | 9:51 AM ET
    A123 Systems logo

    After the last three years and seeing scores of auto plants close down and thousands of plants shut down, it's easy to fall into the trap of thinking the auto industry is dead. Nothing could be further from the truth.

  • Tata's Nano Drives Into the US Wednesday, 13 Jan 2010 | 12:23 PM ET
    Tata Nano

    This car is not yet approved by the DOT for street driving, so my limited test drive was limited to an industrial complex outside Detroit. But even in short drive, the Nano impressed me with plenty of pep and responsive handling. Its tight turning radius will be an asset for zipping around in urban areas with tight spaces. For an entry-level car, it works. You don't get the feeling you are driving a compact car that lacks power and agility.

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