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Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Could Ford Catch Toyota? Monday, 31 Aug 2009 | 9:19 AM ET
    Ford

    These are fun days at Ford. After staring bankruptcy in the eye and surviving a horrific slump in sales, the auto maker is rolling. Sure, it's not yet back in the black, but it has the big "MO". It's adding production, cutting losses, and is in the sweet spot of new product cadence with models like the Edge and Taurus bringing back buyers.

  • It sounds strange to say it, but it's true. The auto industry still has too many plants with the capacity to crank out millions more cars and trucks than needed.

  • Why the Clunker Numbers Baffled People Thursday, 27 Aug 2009 | 11:56 AM ET
    GM logo, General Motors logo

    I thought the final numbers on the Cash for Clunkers program were fairly straight forward.  The Department of Transportation released the top 10 selling models and what percentage of vehicles were sold by each auto maker.  But those numbers don't make sense to many of you.

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