GO
Loading...

John Harwood

CNBC Chief Washington Correspondent

John Harwood is chief Washington correspondent for CNBC and a political writer for The New York Times. He writes the weekly column "Political Memo" for the paper.

Harwood was born in Louisville, Ky., and grew up in the Maryland suburbs outside of the nation's capital. He has been around journalism and politics all his life; his first trip on a presidential campaign press plane came when he was 11 years old and accompanied his father, then a political reporter for The Washington Post.

While still in high school, he began his journalism career as a copy boy at The Washington Star. He studied history and economics at Duke University and graduated magna cum laude in 1978. Harwood subsequently joined The St. Petersburg Times, reporting on police, investigative projects, local government and politics. Later he became state capital correspondent in Tallahassee, Washington correspondent and political editor. While covering national politics, he also traveled extensively to South Africa, where he covered deepening unrest against the apartheid regime.

In 1989, Harwood was named a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he spent the 1989-90 academic year. In 1991, he joined The Wall Street Journal as White House correspondent, covering the administration of the George H. W. Bush. Later Harwood reported on Congress. In 1997, he became The Wall Street Journal's Political Editor and chief political correspondent.

While at The Wall Street Journal, Harwood wrote the newspaper's political column, "Washington Wire," and oversaw the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. In March 2006, he joined CNBC as chief Washington correspondent.

In addition to CNBC, Harwood offers political analysis on NBC's "Meet the Press" and PBS' "Washington Week in Review," among other television and radio programs. Harwood has covered each of the last five presidential elections.

Follow John Harwood on Twitter @johnjharwood.

More

  • I blogged on Monday about the pattern of support that Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have attracted in Democratic nomination contests up to now. The key to breaking the deadlock of their close race is breaking that pattern. Has that now happened?

  • The hardest thing to come by in politics is genuine enthusiasm. Campaigns can buy ads, and direct mail pieces, and robo-calling phone banks. They can't buy zeal. Democrats have it right now. You could see it in last week's Super Tuesday primary results, when even in conservative "red" states more people turned out to vote in Democratic primaries than in Republican ones.

  • Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama

    Barack Obama scored impressive weekend victories over Hillary Clinton in several Democratic presidential nomination contests. He’s well positioned for this week’s voting in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia.

Shark Tank: Outside the Tank

Restaurant Startup: Quick Bites

The Profit Speaks

The Biz Fix with Marcus Lemonis

Ask the Car Chasers