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John Harwood

John Harwood
CNBC Chief Washington Correspondent

John Harwood is chief Washington correspondent for CNBC and a political writer for The New York Times. He writes the weekly column "Political Memo" for the paper.

Harwood was born in Louisville, Ky., and grew up in the Maryland suburbs outside of the nation's capital. He has been around journalism and politics all his life; his first trip on a presidential campaign press plane came when he was 11 years old and accompanied his father, then a political reporter for The Washington Post.

While still in high school, he began his journalism career as a copy boy at The Washington Star. He studied history and economics at Duke University and graduated magna cum laude in 1978. Harwood subsequently joined The St. Petersburg Times, reporting on police, investigative projects, local government and politics. Later he became state capital correspondent in Tallahassee, Washington correspondent and political editor. While covering national politics, he also traveled extensively to South Africa, where he covered deepening unrest against the apartheid regime.

In 1989, Harwood was named a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he spent the 1989-90 academic year. In 1991, he joined The Wall Street Journal as White House correspondent, covering the administration of the George H. W. Bush. Later Harwood reported on Congress. In 1997, he became The Wall Street Journal's Political Editor and chief political correspondent.

While at The Wall Street Journal, Harwood wrote the newspaper's political column, "Washington Wire," and oversaw the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. In March 2006, he joined CNBC as chief Washington correspondent.

In addition to CNBC, Harwood offers political analysis on NBC's "Meet the Press" and PBS' "Washington Week in Review," among other television and radio programs. Harwood has covered each of the last five presidential elections.

Follow John Harwood on Twitter @johnjharwood.

More

  • GOP/Dems: Is Presidential Hopeful List Shrinking? Wednesday, 3 Oct 2007 | 9:13 AM ET
    Newt Gingrich

    The decision by Newt Gingrich to bypass the 2008 presidential race means the fields in both parties are set--at least for now. I wasn't surprised by Gingrich's decision; since talking with him at a press breakfast a couple of weeks ago, I didn't expect his exploratory effort to result in a "Go", though I did expect it to last longer than just a few days.

  • Republicans: Hard For Things To Get Any Worse Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:35 PM ET
    Republican Candidate Duncan Hunter

    Nearly a year after their 2006 wipeout, these are still tough times for the GOP. President Bush and his aides have argued the party must expand beyond white voters. But last night African-American TV personality Tavis Smiley moderated a debate--and the leading republican candidates didn't show up.

  • Clinton/Obama At Dems Debate: Missed Opportunities Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 10:36 AM ET
    democrat_debate_0926.jpg

    The single signature moment of last night's debate was what first appeared to be Hillary Clinton's declaration of independence from her ex-president husband. "He's not the one standing here"--her line after Tim Russert pressed on differences between her position and Bill Clinton's on torture--was a dramatic and effective moment of self-assertion.

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