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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Disney-Marvel Acquisition Aftershocks Wednesday, 2 Sep 2009 | 8:49 AM ET
    Mickey Mouse

    Hollywood is still reeling from the news that Disney is acquiring Marvel Entertainment and all the other media giants are trying to figure out what this means for their businesses and what other acquisitions it will prompt. One Hollywood insider who works for a rival said with a shudder: "Disney's always been an 800 pound gorilla, but now its power with retailers like Wal-Mart is going to be out of control."

  • Twitter's Next Frontier Tuesday, 1 Sep 2009 | 2:20 PM ET
    Twitter

    Two years ago Twitter was the pastime of a niche group in Silicon Valley. Now Twitter seems to be everywhere, and increasingly it's taken seriously as a tool for companies and journalists. It's taken so seriously that sports leagues like the NFL have to issue limits on how players and coaches use social media on game days.

  • Magazines Continue to Suffer Tuesday, 1 Sep 2009 | 11:27 AM ET
    Magazines

    The decline in newsstand magazine purchases may be an indicator of consumer confidence - people are watching their discretionary spending - but I'd argue that newsstand magazine revenues are unlikely to recover when consumer spending does.

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