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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Thanks for Search Ads Tuesday, 25 Nov 2008 | 10:39 AM ET
    Google Search

    In this economic environment even the hot online advertising market is showing declining growth. I just got the latest search share statistics from Nielsen that show that Google has a lot to be grateful for. In October Google did 8.1 percent more searches than it did in the year-ago period.

  • Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the eighth green during a playoff round at the US Open golf tournament, Torrey Pines Golf, San Diego, California.

    GM insists discussions had started earlier in the year, but it seems like more than just a coincidence that just as GM is slammed for overspending (i.e. on those private jets) it's very publicly dropping its high-paid spokesperson.

  • Hollywood Drama: SAG To Vote On Actor's Strike Monday, 24 Nov 2008 | 11:02 AM ET
    Screen Actors Guild

    The idea of a guild striking in this economic environment seems odd, to say the least. Doesn't everyone have more to lose? In Hollywood, after months of a standoff, an actors' strike seems more possible than ever.

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