GO
Loading...

Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Since the news broke that Paramount is delaying the release of its Martin Scorsese thriller "Shutter Island" from October until February, I've talked to a lot of Hollywood insiders about what this says about Paramount's weakness. I've also heard plenty of rants about how this delay speaks to exactly what's wrong with the hundreds of millions of dollars spent every year on movie marketing.

  • Most of the videos YouTube is most famous for -- the wild animal battle at Kruger National Park, the skateboarding bulldog-- haven't been monetized until now. I just broke the news that YouTube is rolling out its partner program to include uploaders of viral hits. YouTube's partner program strikes revenue-sharing deals with the site's regular uploaders of popular content. But many of the site's most popular videos are one-hit-wonders, and now YouTube as well as the uploaders will be able to cash in.

  • It seems like every day there's more news about the demise of print; Readers Digest is the latest storied publication to file for bankruptcy. So that's why I thought it the press release I received this morning detailing a new publication from the Observer Media Group was either a mistake or a joke.

Media

Contact Media

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription
    Please enter a valid email address
    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.