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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Tribeca Buzz: Filmmakers Credit Crunch Woes Thursday, 23 Apr 2009 | 4:00 PM ET

    Tribeca Film Festival kicked off with a party last night, but it's anything but a festive time for independent filmmakers.

  • Tribeca's Hot Topic: Tax Incentives Thursday, 23 Apr 2009 | 12:23 PM ET
    New York City Skyline

    The movie industry is a rare bright spot in the economy. But the billions of production dollars and the business they generate are at risk of going overseas. Studios rely on tax breaks to bring movie budgets down, and if they don't find them stateside, then "Sayonara." Nearly $250 million in federal tax breaks were eliminated from the stimulus bill and now key state incentives could be cut due to budget shortfalls.

  • Green Means $Green$ For Media Companies Wednesday, 22 Apr 2009 | 11:55 AM ET

    Earth Day isn't just about environmentalism, it's also about leveraging consumers interest in green to make some serious green. Envrionmentally-oriented programming is generally a double win for media companies: people are increasingly interested in nature (and respecting the world around them) and it's a great boost for corporate image.

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