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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Music Ends For US Virgin MegaStores Wednesday, 4 Mar 2009 | 11:17 AM ET

    What better punctuates the end of the CD age then Virgin Megastores shutting down its North America locations.

  • Disney's Bob Iger Looks Beyond Recession Wednesday, 4 Mar 2009 | 3:29 AM ET

    Disney can't ignore the reality of the recession and its impact on Disney's business (or its stock price), but CEO Bob Iger insists that the focus is on the long term. The strategy is to create high-quality branded content to leverage across its business divisions and all over the world. Iger says the biggest challenge isn't the economy, but creativity, and keeping its brands thriving.

  • America Has Gone To The Movies Tuesday, 3 Mar 2009 | 9:55 AM ET

    Despite the pullback in consumer spending and the ever-declining stock market, Americans continue to shell out big bucks at the box office.

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