GO
Loading...

Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Hollwyood Actors: Losing Their Steam To Strike? Wednesday, 17 Dec 2008 | 10:36 AM ET
    Screen Actors Guild

    With the Screen Actors Guild leadership pushing for its members to vote to authorize a strike, Hollywood has been buzzing about how bad another work stoppage would be for the industry at this already precarious economic time.

  • Betting on the Box Office Friday, 12 Dec 2008 | 1:38 PM ET

    If you think you have a special skill for predicting the box office, you may be in luck. People have speculated about movie performance for decades, but now an investment firm is working on launching an *actual* market for trading domestic box office futures.

  • More data equals more money. It's a pretty failsafe rule in the word of marketing. The more information you give advertisers on exactly who is really watching your ad, the more you can charge for the ad time.

Featured

Contact Media

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.
    › Learn More