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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Warner's 'Harry Potter' Sequel Pushed Way Back Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 5:58 PM ET

    Warner Bros. made a surprise announcement Thursday -- it's pushing the release of its Harry Potter sequel, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" from November 11 to July 17, 2009. That's eight months!

  • Digital 3-D Movies Coming To A Theatre Near You? Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 12:52 PM ET

    The third dimension is coming soon to a theater near you. No I'm not talking about a movie, but rather a high-stakes drama involving the biggest movie studios and theater chains, enmeshed in a battle over who and how the transition to digital 3-D will be financed.

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