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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Warren Buffett's reputation as a technophobe may be cracking.  Today he told CNBC he'll "probably" get an Amazon Kindle as he "edges" into the 21st century.  See the video clip and read the transcript of Julia Boorstin's Sun Valley conversation with Buffett about technology, the economy, Berkshire's stock slide, and Barack Obama's chances in November.

  • While the media moguls are schmoozing in Sun Valley, all those actors who get your favorite shows on the air have been duking it out over their contract with the producers association, the AMPTP.

  • This event has sparked some of the biggest media deals, from Google's acquisition of YouTube to the Disney-CapCities merger in 1996. This year there's no avoiding the fact that the economy is in a downturn and the credit markets are tight, but it's not keeping the big names from rolling in.

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