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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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    Spielberg and Snider are expected to take most of their current 140 DreamWorks employees with them to their new venture financed with $1.3 billion, the equity put up by India's Reliance and the debut financing from J.P. Morgan

  • Yahoo And Google Holding Back On Ad Deal Monday, 6 Oct 2008 | 1:36 PM ET
    Yahoo partners with Google

    For months I've been covering Yahoo and Google's planned advertising partnership and the controversy surrounding it. After Google CEO Eric Schmidt said they're moving ahead with the partnership even without DOJ approval, the companies are changing their tune.

  • New Study: Bigger Movies Make Bigger Bucks Friday, 3 Oct 2008 | 2:45 PM ET

    The research group looked at movies that opened on 1,000 or more screens between 2003 and 2007. Nine films in the $90 to $100 million range posted an average net profit of $374.7 million, and 80 films costing more than $100 million showed average profitability of $282.3 million.

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