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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Apple is reportedly in talks with music industry giants to strike a deal to offer unlimited music to its customers which would be a dramatic shift from its business model of selling individual songs and albums.

  • Adobe's Better Than Expected Day Tuesday, 18 Mar 2008 | 5:02 PM ET

    After the bell Tuesday, Adobe announced better than expected revenues and earnings. First quarter revenue came in at $890 million, up 37 percent from the year ago quarter. During the quarter the company spent $1.25 billion repurchasing 33.3 million shares of its outstanding stock, putting its GAAP diluted earnings at 38 cents per share, beating the target range...

  • Music Makers: The New Scene For a New Age Tuesday, 18 Mar 2008 | 4:14 PM ET

    The traditional music biz is over as CD sales dropped about 20 percent from 2006 and 2007. And revenues from that physical music business are likely to comprise just 20 percent of an up and coming band's revenue stream.

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