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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • TV advertising is considered the most effective way to reach the masses. But until now it's only been accessible to those with hundreds of thousands of dollars to spend. But that's in the past Thanks to a new technology from ad innovator Spotrunner, candidates in every one of the 500,000 elections this year--no matter how small--will be able to buy TV ads.

  • Comcast, the cable giant, and file sharing web site BitTorrent, seem like natural enemies. The cable company wants to keep "broadband-hogging" BitTorrent from slowing down its system.

  • Motorola Plans Break Up--But Is That Right Move? Wednesday, 26 Mar 2008 | 2:21 PM ET

    Motorola announced today it's planning on splitting up into two publicly traded companies: spinning off its money-losing mobile device business from its growing broadband and mobility solutions business. CEO Greg Brown said on a conference call this morning that having two independently traded companies would unlock value for shareholders

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