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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Music Makers: The New Scene For a New Age Tuesday, 18 Mar 2008 | 4:14 PM ET

    The traditional music biz is over as CD sales dropped about 20 percent from 2006 and 2007. And revenues from that physical music business are likely to comprise just 20 percent of an up and coming band's revenue stream.

  • YouTube Hits A Wrong "Note" With Mariah Carey? Monday, 17 Mar 2008 | 3:58 PM ET

    Just like its parent company Google, YouTube become a verb. I've heard it used two ways: "Did you YouTube that crazy pepsi-mentos stunt?" which usually meaning, did you look the video up on YouTube; or sometimes meaning, did you tape that stunt and put it up on YouTube?

  • CBS

    CBS has a couple strategies to make its shows widely available online. It's the only one of the major networks distributing its shows (ad supported of course) on YouTube. And nearly two years ago CBS created Innertube, the online video player on CBS.com that streams sports, news, and sitcoms.

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