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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • I've been talking to reliable sources, and Lions Gate is about to announce an interim deal with the Writers Guild. It makes sense for a number of reasons--it allows them to produce the next season of Weeds and Mad Men and get those popular shows on air without delay.

  • WGA And Producers: Will Talks Finally End Strike? Thursday, 24 Jan 2008 | 2:07 PM ET
    Writers Guild of America

    Hollywood was hibernating and  now there's finally a thaw. Thanks to the DGA making a deal with the AMPTP, the Writers Guild is in its third day of 'informal talks.' There were even more informal talks before this, but apparently these don't quite count as official just yet.

  • Sundance

    Here's hoping that the writers and producers made some progress over the long holiday weekend. Much of Hollywood is here in Park City at the Sundance film festival, where I've been since Thursday. But one person, one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, is notably absent--super agent Bryan Lourd, co-chairman of talent agency giant, CAA (Creative Artists Agency).

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