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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Writers Guild of America

    While the WGA and Producers Association continues to negotiate, the TV networks are thinking about all the reasons they'd like this strike to wrap up. For one, if the strike drags into next year, advertisers may demand some of their money back. Here's how it usually works: TV networks guarantee advertisers a certain number of eyeballs.

  • Activision "Activates" Wall Street Investors Wednesday, 28 Nov 2007 | 10:26 AM ET
    Activision

    Tuesday was quite the day for video game maker Activision--the stock ended the day up nearly 14 percent. Wall Street was jazzed by the gamemaker's forecasts, which were so hot, they far exceeded even the most optimistic analysts estimates. And early game sales were so positive recently, it bodes very well for the holiday shopping season. Two big franchises are expected to be top sellers this holiday season.

  • Hollywood

    The Writers Guild and the producers association sat down Monday morning for their first negotiations in three weeks. Those negotiations are continuing right now--all a very good sign that a deal is in the works. I've been talking to sources on both sides and the consensus (for today at least) is that the strike is expected to be over before the end of 2007.

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