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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • TiVo's Earnings: New Strategy Appears To Pay Off Thursday, 6 Mar 2008 | 12:47 PM ET

    TiVo announced its earnings Wednesday, showing the results of its new, broader focus-- licensing its technology to cable companies, selling interactive TV ads and results of whether those ads are watched, and pushing forward with movie and music downloads.

  • Comcast's Big Idea To Go After Small Business Thursday, 6 Mar 2008 | 11:27 AM ET

    Comcast's stock has been hammered over the past year--down 20 percent. The company's facing new competition from telecom and satellite TV companies, a cratering home sales market, and bad news from its consumer business, which signs up--or upgrades--customers when they buy new homes.

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