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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Facebook introduced a new ad platform last week, and since then dissent in the media has been slowly growing. After all the buzz about the hot Internet 2.0 company, it remains to be seen if Facebook will fall flat when it actually comes to delivering promised ad revenue.

  • Sony Ready To "Crackle" The Web Thursday, 15 Nov 2007 | 4:38 PM ET

    The entertainment divisions of every media company will suffer from the writers' strike. But media giant Sony is rather well positioned because it's so diversified. I chatted about the strike with Sony CEO Howard Stringer last week and he said if there's a void of new content on TV

  • WGA And Studios: Is Strike Getting Nasty Now? Thursday, 15 Nov 2007 | 11:01 AM ET

    A video made by the Writers Guild is circulating the web. As of now it's been seen 111,000 times on Youtube. It dramatically argues that the studios are cashing in on digital distribution and the writers aren't getting a penny. It starts with Disney CEO Bob Iger saying that Disney has about $1.5 billion in digital revenues.

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