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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Iron Man Audi

    I'm a movie junkie and I'm so happy the summer movie season is underway. You'll probably find me at a theater every weekend between now and the end of July--when the movie premiers finally slow down.

  • Iron Man

    "Iron Man" from Marvel and Paramount opens today, kicking off the summer movie season. With the box office expected to top $85 million opening weekend, Hollywood's pretty excited, and for good reason. The economic downturn is squeezing consumer spending, but there's one corner of the consumer pocketbook that'll emerge unscathed from the "r" word.

  • Media giant Viacom spacer beat Wall Street expectations with strong profits driven by its cable networks (including MTV) and its "Rock Band" video game franchise. Net income grew 33 percent over last year's quarter (excluding an investment write down) to $270 million, while revenue was up 15 percent in the period to 3.12 billion.

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