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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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    NBC Universal (parent company is GE which also owns CNBC) and News Corp's joint online video venture doesn't have a name (though in some circles it's referred to as New Site), and it's ostensibly launching in September but there's no specific launch date. But somehow it's worth $1 billion dollars, at least based on a 10% stake reportedly being sold to private equity firm Providence Equity Partners for $100 million.

  • Richard Branson

    Richard Branson's Virgin Media, said it has delayed its sale until the environment improves enough for all interested parties to bid. The British billionaire Branson is the largest shareholder of this cable TV company, which received one bid from the Carlyle group for some $23 billion, and some nibbles from other private equity players.

  • There's no question that Blockbuster's livelihood is under attack--the business of driving to a store to rent a DVD and driving back when you're done is threatened from video on demand, and digital downloads, especially since both technologies are getting better and faster. So, looking to avoid going the way of the Beta Max, Blockbuster just purchased online movie downloading company Movielink for under $20 million.

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