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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • The media world loves to get revved up about elections and this year the issue is voter registration. Norman Lear is spearheading a campaign called "Declare Yourself." And no surprise, Lear, perhaps one of the most successful television writer/producer in TV history, is using his contacts and his expertise, turning TV humor into a tool. He's gotten two of the stars of "Reno 911" to create four videos to get what they're calling "the target demographic" to vote.

  • Transformers

    I attended the "Transformers" premiere Wednesday night--and my first star spotting epitomized the importance of the film for its parent company. It was Sumner Redstone (he qualifies as a star for the CNBC set) and he was slowly retreating from the hubbub of the red carpet and (surrounded by bodyguards) slipping into a black car.

  • The Motion Picture Association of America filed suits late Tuesday on behlaf of Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox against YouTVpc.com and Peekvid.com. The Wall Street Journal broke the story Wednesday night. The sites don't actually provide copyright-violating material--which is their defence--but they do show users where to find that material, which is the studios' problem with the site.

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