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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • The print newspaper business has problems--declining ad revenue, transitioning to the digital future. Just look at the stock price of the New York Times over the past year--ouch! Well now a hedge fund manager--Firebrand Capital's Scott Galloway--who owns a significant stake in NYT stock is pushing to make some changes.

  • For decades, TV ad time has been sold the very same way: In May, the networks present their new pilots to advertisers, who buy "upfront" ad time, months in advance of the new TV season. And the new TV season always started in the fall, because that's when car advertisers wanted to push their new products.

  • I've been talking to reliable sources, and Lions Gate is about to announce an interim deal with the Writers Guild. It makes sense for a number of reasons--it allows them to produce the next season of Weeds and Mad Men and get those popular shows on air without delay.

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