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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • I snagged Viacom CEO Sumner Redstone for a sit down interview during Allen & Co's day of tech panels. I was glad to catch him as last night, as Google Chariman and CEO Eric Schmidt told a bunch of reporters asking about Viacom's lawsuit against Google--that Viacom has "built its business on lawsuits."

  • This is the I caught Sony CEO Howard Stringer on his way out of the Allen & Co. media content panel. Barry Diller pulled him in at the last minute to join himself, Jeff Bezos, and Sergey Brin in the panel discussion. I asked Stringer about his perspective running a company that does both content creation--at the movie studio, music label, and video game division--and distribution (most recently through the digital distribution of the PlayStation 3.)

  • Sergey Brin

    From the Allen Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho: I just spoke with Sergey Brin who, when asked if Google is interested in acquiring facebook, said " we don't look at companies for acquisition unless they are really interesting.". Then he said that while he thinks the company is interesting he said: "I think they are doing well on their own." He also said google wouldn't go after Facebook unless they came to "talk to us." And it sounded like they certainly haven't approached them yet.

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