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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Google's YouTube Makes "Advertising Pitch" Thursday, 14 Feb 2008 | 3:35 PM ET

    YouTube threw a coming out party of sorts to hundreds of top ad industry execs in New York City this week. The event was called 'Videocracy,' and it's the largest ever advertiser event thrown by Google which bought YouTube for $1.6 billion dollars two years ago.

  • Sony Pictures CEO Lynton Talks About Strike Impact Thursday, 14 Feb 2008 | 12:41 PM ET

    I spoke exclusively with Michael Lynton, the Chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment, about the impact of the work stoppage on his business, and on Hollywood. The video clips are below. Sony's business if focused largely on making movies, which have a long time horizon, so Sony fared much better than its rival studios that own TV networks.

  • The 100 day-long writers strike is officially over. After voting overwhelmingly to return to work Tuesday afternoon, writers returned to the job. It's clear just driving around Los Angeles that things are picking up again--the traffic's much worse! (No joke). Writers and the studios are rushing to throw together pilots for the fall TV season.

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