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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Is Social Networking Yahoo's Holy Grail? Monday, 21 May 2007 | 10:50 AM ET

    Ever since News Corp snapped up MySpace, media companies are on the lookout for other hot social networking sites. And now Yahoo is hoping to score a similar, if smaller, win in the U.K. Yahoo is working on an acquisition of Bebo, the popular British social networking site.This is the first paragraph/short story.

  • Out Front of the Upfronts Wednesday, 16 May 2007 | 11:44 AM ET

    This week of TV "upfront" ad sales is arguably the most important week of the year for the networks -- they're aiming to sell 75 percent of their annual ads. Last year, that amounted to about 9 billion dollars. This year, it's expected to be roughly flat -- that's what the analysts are telling me. But considering the fact that ratings are down from last year, the price advertisers are paying per ratings point is actually inching up!

  • A Hollywood Billion Gets to Work Wednesday, 9 May 2007 | 12:37 PM ET

    Summit Entertainment, a new studio launched two weeks ago with $1 billion in financing led by Merrill Lynch, just unveiled its slate of new development projects -- nine that will go into production this year -- with two films going into production this summer. The plan is to release ten to 12 films a year through its domestic pipeline, and they're not wasting any time.

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